Peter Lloyd

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • in reply to: Macwester 27 #3579
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Hi Susan

    I have four vents like in your picture but they are several inches off the deck and in each case the bottom opening point at about 45 degrees aft. They have the engine compartment in & out vents and fuel tank vents under them. Have you unscrewed the coves and looked behind.?
    Peter

    in reply to: Removing the water tanks Wight 30 #3531
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Hi Len

    • Like you describe my Wight has its two original water tanks either side of the engine compartment with newer stainless steel fuel tanks behind. They each holed about 50 litres, which is usually enough for a week away. I keep the tap between the water tanks nearly closed so they don’t slosh about when tacking, but enough to drain to the pump when drawing water and filling, without needing to keep adjusting the tap. My system has an electric drawing pump and carbon filter, and is fit to drink.
      My eberspatcher is higher than the tanks so it can exhaust just below the gunnels
    in reply to: Macwester Wight #3472
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    As Bob says there are ways of making the old girl move! I have a 1m bow sprit out front with a 130% genoa. It can improved windward to 40-45 degrees, but costs you more when entering a marina. The bow sprit also allows the anchor to be mounted on the sprit away front sail and a storm jib can be mounted on the front stay to form a slot. However, When not in uses I take the front stay back to the mast as it can get in the way when tacking. The mizzen is sometime useful when sailing, but it’s mast is very useful for mounting radar, GPS aerials and wind turbines etc.

    in reply to: Mac Wight engine #3419
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Good news. My mechanic friend reset the tappets and advanced the fuel injector pump 3 degrees and she is now running sweetly.  I am thinking the professional mechanic I had service my engine at the start of lockdown was trying to get a sale on a new engine!

    Now idling at 700rev and goes beyond 2,000 revs smoothly with little to no smoke. The sea trial also suggests I am getting better performance with 1.5kt when idling and ~6kt at 2,000. Also found where oil has been leaking from, so hopefully a clean bilge as well.

    Thanks for your assistance. Peter

     

     

    in reply to: Mac Wight engine #3417
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    I have a mechanic friend coming to have a look at the engine at the weekend as I have been looking forward to sailing up the east coast and around to the Scottish western isles as soon as we are allowed. It was why I had it professionally serviced (including replaced cam belt) before lockdown but now out of lockdown find it no better. It had been running so sweetly at an average of 1.3lt/hr

    Your point about getting everything in order and available before starting is a good one. Thanks

    in reply to: Mac Wight engine #3411
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Thanks Bob

    Yes, the original Newage engine was taken out in 2007 by the previous owner. As he was a car mechanic he converted a Ford 1.6D which until last year has been reliable and worked well. However, it increasingly smokes, at low revs. A service found the injectors had partly frozen, but then getting it restarted has highlighted an unevenness which has been put down to piston rings or valves. Although, I have not experienced blue smoke, oil does leak from the filler cap, so keeping the bilge water clean is difficult. However, oil loss over a year has been minimal.
    The question remains replace or repair (probable requiring a rebore).

    in reply to: Genoa #3371
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    That is certainly food for thought. Whilst what they are offering is expensive. I have seen a number of yachts with two furling’s and if one is set up with a downwind sail and the other for up-wind or storm it is going to cover most cruising situations.

    Thanks

    Peter

    in reply to: Damaged bilge keel Mac 26 #3272
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Hi Siobhan

    If like my Wight the keels are filled with iron ingots, which would account for the hard orange coloured material. I am sure one of the others will be able to tell you more. Linda was able to provide me with some blue print drawings for the Wight which would probably be useful for your rebuild. The Mac 26 is probably built to the same design.

    An additional question I have is. Does the ballast compartment need to be washed to remove the salt from the sea water, before the bilge is re-sealed?

    Best regards

    Peter

    in reply to: Seacock is jammed #3020
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    As a squeal to the above, when out of the water I removed the two top bolts and the seacocks came easily apart. I then cleaned greased and put them back together. Whilst they have worked well since I have them on my list to replace next time she is out of the water on dry land.

    in reply to: Wadden Sea #799
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    The macwesters are good when in a heavy sea because you feel they have experienced worse before. However, for day sailing a lighter boat is going to be better as you can avoid the bad weather. I very much liked sailing to the islands and Marken. Also down through the canal system to Leiden. I will be back again, but heading north up the east coast of U.K. next year.

    in reply to: Wadden Sea #795
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    Do you know how much they were trying to sell black tulip for and whet condition it was in. It looked ok from the outside.

    in reply to: Wadden Sea #789
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    So did you buy Black Tulip or did the other one win and if so is it a MacWester.
    I am sailing in the Humber and East Coast UK this year but intend to return to the Netherlands in a couple of years when I have more free time.

    in reply to: Wadden Sea #2743
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    We didn’t quite have enough time to sail to Schiermonnikoop, but enjoyed sailing and cycling around Ameland which was getting an enlarged harbour. The year before I had used the mast up route to Leiden and was based at Hemmeland marina on the Marken. Hemmeland was very good as it had a 24/7 30min bus service to Amsterdam and therefore schiphol airport.

    Is it the black tulip you are looking at at Lauwersoog. It looked rather nice for being left on the hard over a summer period.

    in reply to: Places to Anchor and Moor Around the UK #2742
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    I will be starting from Hull marina where Cathy is current moored. I have plans to explore the Humber and as far as the wash and Wells this year but then move north to Whitby or Hartlepool next year. From there I hope to explore the Northumberland coast before moving on. I am more inspired by Dylan Winter and turning left than rushing round in 10 to 50 days like the several books I have found offer. Where I then go will depend on the time I have but am interested to explore the inlets and coves a bilge keel boat can access

    in reply to: Wadden Sea #2737
    Peter LloydPeter Lloyd
    Participant

    We sailed on the Wadden Sea last summer. West Terschelling was in the middle of its festival and boats were rafted 7 deep. See my account in the Autumn 2017 Journal. As you say the locals were very helpful and saw quite a few MacWesters in Noorderat Marina in Lauwersoog where we left our boat for several weeks.

    My boat is currently back in the UK and propose to sail from the Humber to sail the East Coast between Wells to Scarborough this year.

    Where are you based. Peter

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)